Exact Match
Standing Parvati
Title Standing Parvati
Title2 Standing Parvati
Museum Name Allahabad Museum, Allahabad
Gallery Name Medieval Sculpture
Object Type Sculpture
Main Material Stone
Component Material II Stone
Component Material III Stone
Manufacturing Technique Chisiling and Carving
Main Artist Not Known
Artist's Nationality Indian
Artist's Life Date / Bio Data Not Known
Author NA
Country India
Provenance Chandausi, Muradabad, Uttar Pradesh.
Origin Place Chandausi, Muradabad, Uttar Pradesh.
Find Place Chandausi, Muradabad, Uttar Pradesh.
Scribe NA
Style Late Medieval
School NA
Patron/Dynasty Late Medieval
Period / Year of Work C.12th Century CE
Inscription No
Tribe NA
Costume NA
Culture NA
Dimensions 42 x 25 cm
Detailed Description Four-armed Parvati, standing in samabhanga, stretches the lower right hand in varada and holds lotus flower in the upper right and trishula and ghanta in the left hands. She is flanked by female chauri-bearers as well as Jaya and Vijaya carrying danda or sword on the sides. Lion is represented on the proper right and mutilated deer (?) on the left of her feet placed on a lotus. Her head is flanked by a malavidyadhara on each side, that on the left being defaced. She wears a jatamukuta, kundalas, torque, hara wristlets and anklets and is draped in a sari and scarf which winds round both her arms. This is a typical early medieval art- specimen of Himalayan hills, characterized by metallic finish, elongation of the figures and an ornamental arched canopy crowning the image which is called as Katyuri Art.
Brief Description Four-armed Parvati, standing in samabhanga, stretches the lower right hand in varada and holds lotus flower in the upper right and trishula and ghanta in the left hands. She is flanked by female chauri-bearers as well as Jaya and Vijaya carrying danda or sword on the sides. Lion is represented on the proper right and mutilated deer (?) on the left of her feet placed on a lotus. Her head is flanked by a malavidyadhara on each side, that on the left being defaced. She wears a jatamukuta, kundalas, torque, hara wristlets and anklets and is draped in a sari and scarf which winds round both her arms. This is a typical early medieval art- specimen of Himalayan hills, characterized by metallic finish, elongation of the figures and an ornamental arched canopy crowning the image which is called as Katyuri Art.