Exact Match
Nataraja
Title Nataraja
Museum Name National Museum, New Delhi
Gallery Name Archaeology
Object Type Archaeology
Main Material Bronze
Country India
Origin Place Tiruvarangulam, South India
Patron/Dynasty Early Chola
Period / Year of Work circa 10th Century AD
Dimensions Ht. 72.5 cm. Wd. 46.2 cm. Dep. 20.5 cm.
Detailed Description It is the most outstanding bronze image of Nataraja in chatura-tandava pose from Tiruvarangulam. The three eyed and four armed Siva is dancing with the right foot placed on the prostrate demon Apasmara and the left by resting on the toes. The rear right hand holds the damaru and the front right hand is in abhaya mudra with a serpent coiled around the forearm, the rear left carries the flame and the front left is in gaja or danda hasta pose. The hair is dressed high in jatamukuta and bears a crescent moon to the proper left. Braided locks are hanging at the back. A Siras-chakra is shown behind the head. A thin sash runs around the waist. It is narrowed in front, and has a projecting loop on either side. The costume consists of short drawers worn with an elaborate girdle decorated with a floral clasp in front. He wears a tiara with fillet, several ear-rings, a chain of flowers on each shoulder, yajnopavita, necklace, udarabandha, spiral armlets, bracelets, rings and anklets. The prostrate demon holds a cobra in the left hand while the right hand is in suchi mudra. The image is on a double lotus pedestal mounted on a rectangular block. It is a unique piece of its kind, which ranks first among the important Nataraja images. It is a very fine example of the early Chola art. The cosmic dance of lord Siva in his Nataraja form symbolizes five actions known as panchakrtyas: creation, protection, destruction, removal of ignor
Brief Description Three-eyed and four-armed image of Siva Nataraja in chaturtandava pose, dancing with the right foot placed on the prostrate demon Apasmara and the left leg resting on the toes. The arms are bifurcate at the shoulders. The rear right hand holds the damaru (kettle-drum) between the first and second fingers, the front right in abhaya-mudra with a serpent (head missing) coiled around the forearm; the rear left carries the flame (jvala), and the front left arm is across the body in the dancing gesture gaja or danda-hasta. The hair is dressed high (jata-makuta) and bears a crescent- moon (ardhachandra) to the proper left. Thirteen braided locks are hanging at the back of the head. A siras-chakra (damaged) behind the head. A thin sash round the waist, narrowed in front, has a projecting loop on either side. The costume consists of short drawers (Kachha), worn with an elaborate girdle. the latter with a floral clasp in front. Other details include a tiara with fillet, ear-rings (makara- kundala in the right and patra-kundala in the left ears) a chain of flowers on each shoulder, yajnopavita, an ornamented necklace, udarabandha, spiral armlets (keyuras) and another armlet with tassel at the elbow, three bracelets on each wrist rings on every finger and toes except the middle ones, and anklets (pada-jalakas). The prostrate demon holds a cobra in the left hand, while the right hand is in suchi-mudra. The image is on a double lotus oval-shaped pedestal, mounted on a rectangular block. There is a ring at each of the four corners of the base. There is an up right on either side to hold the prabha (jvala-mala or flaming aureole) which is wanting. This image is a masterpiece of South Indian Bronzes and a unique piece of its kind.