Artist

(nandalal bose)
  Exact Match
Filter
Search Result 1-10 / 752
  • Painting depicts two young ladies.
  • The artist portrays the Parthasarathi, who is the sarathi or charioteer of Partha or Arjuna is Krishna. He is holding the cord of chariot with his full strength in left hand, which signifies the control of the time or kala, while the right hand shows tarjani mudra. He is a living personality of godhead. He is bedecked with princely attire. The style of painting is purely in Ajanta manner. He came down to earth to extend his grace and love to his devotees, to save the righteous and punish the wicked, to remove the evils and establish virtue. "For when so ever right declines and wrong up rises, then I create myself. To guard up the good and destroy the wicked and to confirm the right I come into being in this age and that."
  • Nandalal Bose had a close relationship with Gandhi and shared many of his ideals. He was the only artist ever patronized by the great leader, who often insisted he had no time for art. Bose's canonical black-and-white print depicts Gandhi's 240 mile, Dandi march, taken out to defy a British tax on salt-giving an image to one of the most iconic acts of the Indian freedom movement. Nandalal Bose immortalized the image of Gandhi's Dandi march. In Bose's first painting depicting the subject, all 78 followers are pictured in the background with Gandhi as the central figure, capturing the spirit of the event. Shortly thereafter, the same subject was reproduced as a black and white print without the background, simply and powerfully capturing the spirit and persona of Gandhi as the leader of a new movement. During this time, Bose also created several posters in support of the civil disobedience movement but they were immediately torn down and destroyed, virtually none have survived. Bose's image of Gandhi is one of the most iconic images of the 20th Century; as iconic as the portraits of Che Guevara and Chairman Mao, demonstrating the power of mass medium (printmaking) to mass mobilize. Bose was among the first to recognize that the image of Gandhi alone had the potential to unify a movement beyond the realm of a select few to express the collective will of a new nation.
  • A strong interest in the folk idiom inspires this painting, wherein a group of Santhali tribal men are depicted dancing. The sense of movement visible from the feet of the dancers, and the rhythm of the composition suggest that the artist witnessed this event, titled 'harvest dance', live. The wavy lines, earthy colours and speed of brush work show Nandalal Bose's desire to portray Santhali culture as a rich, and vibrant one as well as capture the rhythmic movement of the performance. Nandalal Bose had a close relationship with Gandhi and shared many of his ideals. He was the only artist ever patronized by the great leader, who often insisted he had no time for art.
  • Gandhi placed Nandalal Bose in-charge of creating a unique environment infused with local art and craft, for the annual session of the Indian National Congress at Haripura, near Bardoli in Gujarat in February of 1938. As a significant component of this huge public art campaign, Nandalal planned separate paintings which were later to become famous as 'Haripura posters' depicting Indian life in all its variety. The charm and the playful gaiety exuded by the linguistic features blend perfectly well with the contents depicting subjects like Hunters, Musicians, Bull Handlers, Carpenter, Smiths, Spinner, Husking women and modest scenes of rural life including animal rearing, child-nursing and cooking. The simplicity of these works also lies in the unvarying use of the point-cusped niche that frames the principal subject.
  • Gandhi placed Nandalal Bose in-charge of creating a unique environment infused with local art and craft, for the annual session of the Indian National Congress at Haripura, near Bardoli in Gujarat in February of 1938. As a significant component of this huge public art campaign, Nandalal planned separate paintings which were later to become famous as 'Haripura posters' depicting Indian life in all its variety. The charm and the playful gaiety exuded by the linguistic features blend perfectly well with the contents depicting subjects like Hunters, Musicians, Bull Handlers, Carpenter, Smiths, Spinner, Husking women and modest scenes of rural life including animal rearing, child-nursing and cooking. The simplicity of these works also lies in the unvarying use of the point-cusped niche that frames the principal subject.
  • Initial content