Artist

(upendra maharathi (1908-1981))
  Exact Match
Filter
Search Result 1-10 / 630
  • Upendra Maharathi uses Bengal school mannerism and romanticism to blend it with new themes, subjects and geometric simplifications. The above painting title ‘bloody sunset’ signifies the death of Gandhi ji. The flow of warm colors spreading all over the composition and falling down on the body of Mahatma Gandhi.
  • The above painting is one of the many exact copies of the frescoes that adorn the walls of the Ajanta and Bagh caves, it is of a beautiful Apsara wearing traditional jewellery. As the apsara leans forward her necklace falls gently over her body. Artists like Nandalal, Mukul Dey and Maharathi are known to have visited these places and spent weeks and months meticulously copying and recording the fresoes.
  • Upendra Maharathi uses Bengal school mannerism and romanticism to blend it with new themes, subjects and geometric simplifications. In the above painting Maharathi has depicted a soul emerging from the sea waves, beautifully rendered with the shades of vibrant colors in tonal variation delineating the forms.
  • Deeply impressed and influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and the Indian Independence movement the artist paid his respect by telling their stories through his paintings. He made a series of realistic portraits of many of India's martyrs. The collection of NGMA has a number of portraits of eminent freedom fighters such as Lal Bahadur Shastri, Lala Lajpat Rai, Sardar Patel among others. This one is a rare portrait painting of a Japanese boy.
  • Upendra Maharathi uses Bengal school mannerism and romanticism to blend it with new themes, subjects and geometric simplifications. The above painting title ‘Starvation in four generations’ depicts four generation from child to an old woman having weak pale expressions due to starvation. The subject has been rendered with mute colours against the background having shades of orange.
  • Upendra Maharathi uses Bengal school mannerism and romanticism to blend it with new themes, subjects and geometric simplifications. In the above painting title ‘Tandava of Shiva’ depicts Shiva in a graceful posture performing Tandava which is a divine dance performed by him for the cycle of creation, preservation and dissolution. The Shiva has been depicted with the use of mute colour against the background having warm colours creating flames and foreground having the shades of blue.
  • Maharathi has a series of paintings that he has titled 'Images in Rocks'. He often chose to paint the images that accidentally formed by a creative formation of rocks. The above painting depicts a scene with a silhouetted unidentified figure against a bright fluorescent green sky.
  • Upendra Maharathi uses Bengal school mannerism and romanticism to blend it with new themes, subjects and geometric simplifications. In the above watercolour sketch, he has depicted a woman carrying pitcher and entering an empty room while looking backward. The subject has been rendered with swift strokes of watercolour in tonal variation delineating the contours of the forms.