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(graphic art)
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  • The practice of printmaking as a fine art medium gained immense popularity with the establishment of Kala Bhavan founded by Rabindranath Tagore in 1919, wherein new styles of printmaking were explored through an organization called the 'Bichitra Club'. A prominent member of this club was artist Mukul Chandra Dey, who was the first Indian artist to go abroad in the 1920's to learn graphic art. Indian painter-engraver Mukul Chandra Dey, was an important personality of his time. A student of Santiniketan School during the early years of the 20th century, he left his mark as a pioneer of dry point-etching in India. Having interacted closely with such Japanese masters as Yokoyama Taikan, Shimomura Kanzan, his skill with lines, and familiarity and exposure with Eastern printmaking traditions such as the Ukiyo-e prints, widened. Dey used the copper plate, and print surfaces like a sketch book, which he would re work at a later stage and make prints of. Some of the thematics that recur in his work are rural landscapes, mythical narratives, festivals, and the indigenous people of Bengals; the Santhals. His prints of people often capture the graceful movement of limbs, and have been referred to as rather idyllic and romantic. His landscapes though are exquisitely portrayed spaces, always maintaining an ambivalence between man and nature, real and mythical.
  • Benode Behari Mukherjee led art beyond the dominance of literary subjects and mythology, to a form that gave importance to pictorial elements such as color, line and texture. As an artist, he has experimented with many mediums, ranging from murals to collage, from woodcuts to calligraphy, from watercolors, oil paint, ink and crayons to graphics. He was known to record his visual experiences on small cards, and occasionally in large brush-and-ink drawings, or paintings. He explored the capacity to show character in a subject through the juxtaposing of positive and negative space. His prints like 'Girl', 'Evening Accounts', or 'Man Seated' consciously hint at creating social commentaries, setting the tone for the period of social realism that followed, in the 1930's.
  • Laxma Goud began his printmaking in Black and White, and moved to color only after two decades of his practice. His iconography is earthy, sensuous, erotic and demonic at the same time. His animals and humans copulated unrestrainedly and openly in the village landscape of tress. The delicate use of line and the concepts surrounding fantasy where animals and sexual genitals are depicted pierced with ornaments. Fascinated with erotic subjects from the beginning by the late 60's he evolved a distinct style in his etchings which portrayed a pan-natural sexuality seen in terms of impulsive, aggressive passions rather than those of fertility
  • The work of Zarina Hashmi is defined by her adherence to the personal and the essential. An early interest in architecture and mathematics is reflected in her use of geometry and her emphasis on structural purity. While her work tends towards minimalism, its starkness is tempered by its texture and materiality. Her art poignantly chronicles her life and recurring themes include home, displacement, borders, journey and memory. Best known as a printmaker, Hashmi prefers to carve instead of draw the line, to gouge the surface rather than build it up. She has used various mediums of printmaking including intaglio, woodblocks, lithography and silkscreen.
  • Haren Das was born in a small town called Dinajpur in, what is today Bangladesh, but was trained in Graphic arts in Kolkata. He worked as a teacher, and introduced line engraving and etching into the art curriculum of the Government College of Arts and Crafts, thus laying the foundation for print making and graphic art education in India. Most of his works, especially his woodcuts and engravings, captured rural, pastoral Bengal, or laborers and the farming community at work. Despite using restrain and economy, Das has managed to offer a glimpse of a Bengal that no longer exists. Most of his work is a nostalgic reflection into a childhood and a youth spent at Dinajpur. In his works, the artist depicts man as part of nature, an individual who lives in harmony with the elements surrounding him.
  • "The mother Teressa series (1979) was most important in the way it was conceived for it went back about 15 years when I was working on the church with Charles Correa with the stained glass effect dedicated tro Cimabue. I was deeply influenced by Byzantine art, relationships of Araperies robes, the folds very much stick in me, So when I thought of expressing Mother Teressa, these ideas came to my mind,. The mother theme was very deep rooted for me, given my own loss at an early age." The contradiction and inconsistencies of our civilization are revealed pictorially by the juxtaposition of masses of colour, and a complex symbolism which is a synthesis of traditional and modern mythology. The amorphous colours and complex masses of Hussain's earlier pictures have undergone a rigorous discipline resulting in simplicity. It is a development which springs from a recognition of the materials he uses.
  • "The mother Teressa series (1979) was most important in the way it was conceived for it went back about 15 years when I was working on the church with Charles Correa with the stained glass effect dedicated tro Cimabue. I was deeply influenced by Byzantine art, relationships of Araperies robes, the folds very much stick in me, So when I thought of expressing Mother Teressa, these ideas came to my mind,. The mother theme was very deep rooted for me, given my own loss at an early age." The contradiction and inconsistencies of our civilization are revealed pictorially by the juxtaposition of masses of colour, and a complex symbolism which is a synthesis of traditional and modern mythology. The amorphous colours and complex masses of Hussain's earlier pictures have undergone a rigorous discipline resulting in simplicity. It is a development which springs from a recognition of the materials he uses.
  • Devyani Krishna's introspection did not demand the use of socially relevant comments or the figurative idiom. Her printmaking journey reflected a rare feminine attempt to fuse the ancient symbolism of various religions with the contemporary demand of self-awareness and its scientific inclinations. This print is part of a series called 'Allah', where she abstracted the calligraphic use of the Persian letters, to create a form to an aniconic religion.
  • Haren Das was born in a small town called Dinajpur in, what is today Bangladesh, but was trained in Graphic arts in Kolkata. He worked as a teacher, and introduced line engraving and etching into the art curriculum of the Government College of Arts and Crafts, thus laying the foundation for print making and graphic art education in India. Most of his works, especially his woodcuts and engravings, captured rural, pastoral Bengal, or laborers and the farming community at work. Despite using restrain and economy, Das has managed to offer a glimpse of a Bengal that no longer exists. Most of his work is a nostalgic reflection into a childhood and a youth spent at Dinajpur. In his works, the artist depicts man as part of nature, an individual who lives in harmony with the elements surrounding him.
  • The practice of printmaking as a fine art medium gained immense popularity with the establishment of Kala Bhavan founded by Rabindranath Tagore in 1919, wherein new styles of printmaking were explored through an organization called the 'Bichitra Club'. A prominent member of this club was artist Mukul Chandra Dey, who was the first Indian artist to go abroad in the 1920's to learn graphic art. Indian painter-engraver Mukul Chandra Dey, was an important personality of his time. A student of Santiniketan School during the early years of the 20th century, he left his mark as a pioneer of dry point-etching in India. Having interacted closely with such Japanese masters as Yokoyama Taikan, Shimomura Kanzan, his skill with lines, and familiarity and exposure with Eastern printmaking traditions such as the Ukiyo-e prints, widened. Dey used the copper plate, and print surfaces like a sketch book, which he would re work at a later stage and make prints of. Some of the thematics that recur in his work are rural landscapes, mythical narratives, festivals, and the indigenous people of Bengals; the Santhals. His prints of people often capture the graceful movement of limbs, and have been referred to as rather idyllic and romantic. His landscapes though are exquisitely portrayed spaces, always maintaining an ambivalence between man and nature, real and mythical.