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  • Mukul Dey in his artistic career, developed prints narrating Indian subjects and themes, particularly acclaimed are those of the Bengali women, the street corners of Bengal, the rivers, Santhals and the cityscape of Calcutta with its colonial monuments, busy by-lanes and the river front. In the above illustration, the artist has rendered a sketch of a village, with bold, firm yet fluid strokes incised on to a metal sheet and transferred on the plain surface with the help of ink, articulating the contours of the figure.
  • The collection of NGMA has close to 390 artworks of Mukul Dey which include drawings, sketches and prints acquired by the museum from the artist's family and from other private art collections. The artist's works include portraits and drawings of the renowned personalities of the time from diverse fields of politics, literature, science, education and also of the leading entrepreneurs, acquaintances, family members and friends. Apart from the portraits the collection also has paintings executed in the Bengal School style portraying landscapes especially of the Bengal countryside, the native people in all their glory, the flora and fauna, the saints and Bauls preaching wisdom through the villages, the monuments and also those narrating the religious fables, the folk tales and customs of the land. The above portrait is of Charles P. Larsen, a fellow artist of Mukul Dey, whom he met during his stay in America. Charles P. Larsen and Mukul Dey, both exhibited their prints at the Chicago Society of Etchers' Exhibition, 1918. This print depicts a young Charles, holding a stylus and intently looking down at his work. A flowering pot is also seen in the image.
  • The collection of NGMA has close to 390 artworks of Mukul Dey which include drawings, sketches and prints acquired by the museum from the artist's family and from other private art collections. The artist's works include portraits and drawings of the renowned personalities of the time from diverse fields of politics, literature, science, education and also of the leading entrepreneurs, acquaintances, family members and friends. Apart from the portraits the collection also has paintings executed in the Bengal School style portraying landscapes especially of the Bengal countryside, the native people in all their glory, the flora and fauna, the saints and Bauls preaching wisdom through the villages, the monuments and also those narrating the religious fables, the folk tales and customs of the land. Mukul Dey mastered the technical nuances of the western print making process to express the romanticism and mysticism of the Indian culture. His stay at Santiniketan was particularly fruitful in the backdrop of the naturalistic surroundings of the place which is amply reflected in some of his early sketches of the Santhal tribes.
  • The collection of NGMA has close to 390 artworks of Mukul Dey which include drawings, sketches and prints acquired by the museum from the artist's family and from other private art collections. The artist's works include portraits and drawings of the renowned personalities of the time from diverse fields of politics, literature, science, education and also of the leading entrepreneurs, acquaintances, family members and friends. Apart from the portraits the collection also has paintings executed in the Bengal School style portraying landscapes especially of the Bengal countryside, the native people in all their glory, the flora and fauna, the saints and Bauls preaching wisdom through the villages, the monuments and also those narrating the religious fables, the folk tales and customs of the land. The above etching print narrates a crowded street in Burra Bazar, a marketplace in Calcutta (now Kolkata) with its usual chaos and commotion.
  • Mukul Chandra Dey was a pioneering artist of dry point etching in India. His work depicts subjects of Indian life and legends from a common manĂ¢??s viewpoint.  In his work we see the reflection of the river scenes of Bengal, the baul singers, the bazaars of Calcutta, the life of Santhal villages in Birbhum, etc.  He is also remembered for his portraits of the rich and the famous like those of the Tagores, Albert Einstein, M.K. Gandhi, the Tatas, and others.  This etching print shows a young woman of the Santhal tribe.
  • The collection of NGMA has close to 390 artworks of Mukul Dey which include drawings, sketches and prints acquired by the museum from the artist's family and from other private art collections. The artist's works include portraits and drawings of the renowned personalities of the time from diverse fields of politics, literature, science, education and also of the leading entrepreneurs, acquaintances, family members and friends. Apart from the portraits the collection also has paintings executed in the Bengal School style portraying landscapes especially of the Bengal countryside, the native people in all their glory, the flora and fauna, the saints and Bauls preaching wisdom through the villages, the monuments and also those narrating the religious fables, the folk tales and customs of the land. Mukul Dey mastered the technical nuances of the western print making process to express the romanticism and mysticism of the Indian culture. His stay at Santiniketan was particularly fruitful in the backdrop of the naturalistic surroundings of the place which is amply reflected in some of his early sketches. The above aquatint print is one such example showing a cut-out figure of a woman, titled as a santhal maiden by the artist, in a monochromatic black and white landscape.
  • Mukul Dey in his artistic career, developed prints narrating Indian subjects and themes, particularly acclaimed are those of the Bengali women, the street corners of Bengal, the rivers, Santhals and the cityscape of Calcutta with its colonial monuments, busy by-lanes and the river front. In the above print, the artist has depicted a Santhal maiden walking amid a garden, rendered with bold, firm yet fluid strokes incised on to a metal sheet and transferred on the plain surface with the help of ink, delineating the contours of the figure.
  • Mukul Dey in his artistic career, developed prints narrating Indian subjects and themes, particularly acclaimed are those of the Bengali women, the street corners of Bengal, the rivers, Santhals and the cityscape of Calcutta with its colonial monuments, busy by-lanes and the river front. In the above print, the artist has depicted a man standing and holding a flute with his hand, rendered with bold, firm yet fluid strokes incised on to a metal sheet and transferred on the plain surface with the help of ink, delineating the contours of the figure.
  • The collection of NGMA has close to 390 artworks of Mukul Dey which include drawings, sketches and prints acquired by the museum from the artist's family and from other private art collections. The artist's works include portraits and drawings of the renowned personalities of the time from diverse fields of politics, literature, science, education and also of the leading entrepreneurs, acquaintances, family members and friends. Apart from the portraits the collection also has paintings executed in the Bengal School style portraying landscapes especially of the Bengal countryside, the native people in all their glory, the flora and fauna, the saints and Bauls preaching wisdom through the villages, the monuments and also those narrating the religious fables, the folk tales and customs of the land. The artist has accomplished in capturing the stern expression of the sitter. B. G. Horniman was a British journalist and editor of the Bombay Chronicle. The above portrait is of a lady called 'Kiyo San' who's exact relation with Dey hasn't been identified, she probably would have been an acquaintance he met during his stay in Japan. The above drawing is a part of a collection of Mukul Dey etchings and drawings which was acquired by the NGMA from his wife, Bina Dey.
  • Mukul Dey in his artistic career, developed prints narrating Indian subjects and themes, particularly acclaimed are those of the Bengali women, the street corners of Bengal, the rivers, Santhals and the cityscape of Calcutta with its colonial monuments, busy by-lanes and the river front. In the above print, the artist has depicted a horse wagon resting under the tree, rendered with bold, firm yet fluid strokes incised on to a metal sheet and transferred on the plain surface with the help of ink, delineating the forms.